Senator Kamala Harris & Blue Ivy Carter Spread ‘Boomshakalaka’ to Woke Things Up – #HometownChat

Hot Shot (Old-School): “Real Talk with Industry Players and Biz Leaders”
– Jay-Z, Entrepreneur, Rapper & Mega Mogul

Hot Shot (New-School): “Real Talk with Industry Players and Biz Leaders”
– ‘Black Nostalgia,’ Cultural Commentator

doc-speak

#HometownChat – “Smart Community, Special Service, Civic Dreams”

The July 4th fireworks are behind us but guess who showed-up at the BBQ? It’s Blue Ivy Carter doing some lyrical ‘spitting’ from daddy’s new album ‘Jay-Z 4:44.’ It’s like the apple of his eye not falling far from the tree. Blue Ivy and Senator Kamala Harris are spreading some ‘boomshakalaka’ to woke things up.

Harris has been making her voice heard as a freshman Senator on Capitol Hill. She’s about asking tough questions in her role on the Senate Intelligence Committee. She’s even been asking constituents and citizens to think about what affordable healthcare should mean at a time when it seems to be up in the air.

Some people are trying to understand what Blue Ivy is saying on the track. Plus, what would you call the sound clip, a good PR move for sure? Well 50 years after Newark’s uprising others are trying to figure-out what our government officials are doing and saying about the next steps in public policy or community.

In the case of public policy, some wonder what to call a healthcare bill that doesn’t seem to want more people to have healthcare. That might be a different kind of PR with ‘politically ratchet’ results. So we find a growing frustration among citizens about the tedious nature of healthcare features, fixes and services.

Think back 20+ years when consumers and techies became frustrated by software features, fixes and services. Industry leaders and decision makers came up with what’s simply known these days as IOS solutions. What can we learn from their ingenuity that can be applied to public policy or community?

  1. What people want to see is change that’s more than just going through the motion.
  2. What officials should do is more than just a patchwork but more like some process-work.
  3. What systems learn is how to make things work for all users, whether in the ‘hood or the ‘burbs.
  4. What effective results show isn’t just good for income streams but also in outcome measures.

Who doesn’t remember those times when using some software tools or logging into the Internet felt like going through a traffic jam? There’d be a message across the screen saying ‘it’s working’ while the screen just sat there. It wasn’t always a click of the mouse or a flick of the wrist that did the trick.

These days it feels like the message we get from public officials says ‘it’s working’ but who knows if the change we see is just going through the motion. Maybe people feel the same way about the approaches to inner city issues or rural town concerns that feel like more of the same ol’ going through the motion.

Oftentimes in the tech world, software fixes are made as a patch to the system. This provides a quick and easy way to respond to a problem. That’s fine and good for those ‘1-2-3’ to handle problems. But when things are more involved it takes a thought-out upgrade process to make the problem go away.

What tech leaders know is that after a while a fix needs to be more than a patchwork and more about a process-work. In other words, a patch might be good for ‘classic community’ but it takes effective process-work for ‘smart community’ so that some persistent problems might be handled or go away over time.

It’s what happened back in the day when technology went from DOS to Windows or from flip phones to smart phones. The power players knew there needed to be a system’s approach to fixing problems. That’s kinda how they ended up with developing IOS solutions as an Integrated Operating System model.

There’re three key reasons why the IOS approach helped technology change for the better and move us leaps and bounds. In these changes we saw improvements in how fixes got done. We saw progress in how features became more user-friendly. We saw how certain pre-wired functions made life a bit easier.

This was the best thing yet in how consumers used technology. What if there was a similar approach to public policy and next level community? It’s why Community 3.0 offers SOS solutions to help advance social outcomes and services that could lead to the best thing yet in citizen-friendly solutions.

The tech shift helped boost incomes as companies made more Windows-based software or user-friendly apps. A similar shift when applied to ‘social change’ as an SOS approach can also bring positive change whether in the ‘hood or ‘burbs. It’s in boosting hometown service, civic dreams and social outcomes.

Recently, the TV show Jeopardy had a category called ‘Stay Woke.’ Some thought it was meant to be the socially-conscious version of the expression. They soon learned it was meant in the normal sense of ‘things that keep us physically awake.’ e.g. coffee. That meaning disappointed viewers on social media.

Maybe that’s the dilemma people are having with the healthcare view of Repeal & Replace. What it means for one group is different from another. It seems the real discussion should be about healthcare Repair & Repaint. Even Insurance Companies know you don’t write-off a property unless it’s ‘totaled.’

blueivy

Senator Harris and Blue Ivy might know something about a hot playlist to ‘jam the block.’ But Harris would likely agree that to ‘upgrade you’ in community and public policy, we should remember the words of Margaret Mead, a 20th century Anthropologist and cultural figure. She said “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful citizens can change the world. Indeed it is the only thing that ever has.”

Block Talkback: Should the healthcare discussion be about ‘Repeal & Replace’ or ‘Repair & Repaint?’

Groove-tracks: Childish Gambino – Redbone – https://youtu.be/ezbsbkqoRrs

Beyoncé – Upgrade You –  https://youtu.be/6nr8hPnZfMU